Saturday, June 25, 2016

Notan: The Dark and Light Principle of Design[1]
Art Essay

Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Introduction
"Notan" is a Japanese word meaning dark-like. However, the word has far greater depth than its literal translation. Behind its literal translation the underlying principle of Notan can be thought as the interaction between positive (light) and negative (dark) spaces. The idea of this interaction is embodied in the ancient Eastern symbol of the Yin and the Yang, which consists of mirrored images, one white and one black revolving around the point of equilibrium.

Yin-Yang symbol of Ancient China.

Here the positive and negative areas make up the whole created through the unity of opposites that have equal and inseparable realities. In the Yang and the Yin symbol, as in Notan, opposites complement one another and so they are not in conflict with each other. Neither seeks to negate nor to dominate one another, only to relate to each other in harmony. It is this interplay between light and dark that is most essential.

The Western cultures terms of opposed dualities come with attached moral values such as "good" for the positive and "bad" for the negative side. On the other hand, Eastern cultures acknowledge that when opposites are united there is no moral attachment to either. For example, both female and male cells must unite in order to create life. The Yin and the Yang is therefore a process without moral judgement.

There is a wonderful book[1] that teaches the basic design principles that underlie Notan and so it is a "must" reference for your library. I have utilized this reference to produce this post.


Notan in Everyday Life[1]
Many of the examples of Notan in this post are taken from folk art. The intuitive folk artists, unlike the formally trained graphic designers in the modern era, do not have to be taught or to remember the negative is in balance with the positive. The primitive artists feel a part of nature and so often their designs reflected the sense of positive and negative design elements interacting to balance one another. For example, the Pueblo Indian craftsman who decorated a simple dish with a bird (see below) was very much concerned with integration of form and decoration.

Clay dish. Pueblo Indian work, Acoma, New Mexico.

The symmetry of the design is relieved by the turn of the bird's head. The distribution of the pattern is dictated by symbolic meaning. The inseparable parts of the design are the spaces around the bird, which underlies the exchange and balance of positive and negative spaces.

The African decorator of the calabash (see below) made a simple design that was definitely integrated with the oval shape of the calabash. Nothing is hidden - the rim of the wood is exposed; it is easy to see the basic building material.

Carved and dyed calabash from Oyo, Western Nigeria.

Although the composition of the dish is symmetrical and fixed, the birds seem to be climbing because of the implicit feel of movement in the negative shapes between their feet and the tree.

Notan in primitive and modern cultures often appears in useful objects such as tools etc. For example, the old style razor blades when in a given arrangement may offer a Notan experience.

Razor blades.

Though the openings of these razor blades are utilitarian, when seen as Notan they become decorative units working with white and negative spaces to form an interesting pattern.

The holes of keys can form a visual rhythm because of the varied spaces in between the keys and the shapes of the keys themselves. This rhythmic interplay is the basis of Notan.

For the artist working in stitchery, appliqué or quilting, a mastery of Notan may become important. Many traditional American quilt patterns, as well as bold Hawaiian ones, are based on positive and negative reversals. In the traditional patterns Notan will appear through the contrasts in arrangements of the geometrical or figurative units. The San Blas Indian appliqué has many cloths of different colors layered together. The design is created from negative spaces or from holes or slits cut through to bare the different layers of the cloth beneath.

Appliqué stitchery, San Blas Indian work - Panama.
A beautiful integration of birds, plants and the spaces surrounding them.

In the Hawaiian quilt the Notan is created from the contrast of two layers of cloth; one brighter colored cloth, almost the size of the quilt, is folded and cut away (paper-doll or snowflake style) to create a design in one piece, which, when appliquéd to a white quilt, will create an interacting design.

Notan snowflakes quilt.

The weaver who studies Notan will begin to understand that underlying much of their work is struggling with positive and negative relationships. A closely woven tapestry can depict a two dimensional design - abstract or figurative - which can be developed with a painter's understanding of Notan. Much traditional pattern weaving is based on the control of positive and negative reversals, stunning examples which appear in Peruvian work.

Women at a weaving co-operative in Peru's Sacred Valley.

Structural weaving must also depend on an understanding and control of negative spaces. A stole, for instance, made in lino or gauze weave consists of twisted warp threads held together by weft in sufficient tension to create negative diamond or lozenge spaces. In three dimensional weaving also - from Indian baskets to modern woven sculptures - the forms are governed by their containment of the negative spaces.

American Indian basket.


Reference:
[1] D. Bothwell and M. Mayfield, Notan, Dover Publication Inc., New York (1991).

Saturday, June 18, 2016

Image Dreamings:
Basic Silk Screen Printing Workshop - Part I
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program

Tutor: Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Preamble
This blogspot exhibits many of my students outputs from a variety of workshops. There are one, two and five day workshops as well as workshops that have a different focus. Nevertheless, it always surprises me how much I learn from my students and how enthusiastic they are to learn and so for your convenience, I have listed the workshop posts below.

The University of Newcastle Multi-Media Course
The University of Newcastle (Newcastle and Ourimbah Campuses, NSW, Australia) 2008 to 2010.

One and Two Day Disperse Dye Workshops
Various Textile Groups (Australia) 2008 - 2011.

Five Day Workshop - In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
“Wrapt in Rocky” Textile Fibre Forum Conference (Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia) 29th June to 5th July 2008.

Five Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
Orange Textile Fiber Forum (Orange, NSW, Australia) 19th to 25th April 2009.

5 Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
Geelong Fiber Forum (Geelong, Victoria, Australia) 27th September to 3rd October 2009.

Two Day Workshop - Deconstructed and Polychromatic Screen Printing
Beautiful Silks (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) 20th to 21st March 2010.

Five Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
“Wrapt in Rocky” Biennial Textile Forum/Conference Program (Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia) 25th June to 1st July 2010.

Two Day Workshop – Improvisational Screen Printing
ATASDA (Sydney, NSW, Australia) 28th to 29th August 2010.

Two Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth (Day One)
”Stitching and Beyond” Textile Group (Woodbridge, Tasmania, Australia) 2nd to 3rd October 2010.

Two Day Workshop – In Pursuit of Complex Cloth (Day Two)
”Stitching and Beyond” Textile Group (Woodbridge, Tasmania, Australia) 2nd to 3rd October 2010.

Advance Silk Screen Printing
Redcliffe City Art Gallery Redcliffe, Queensland, Australia) 10th April 2011.

One Day Workshop - In Pursuit of Complex Cloth
The Victorian Feltmakers Inc. (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) 14th May 2011.

One Day Workshop - In Pursuit of Complex Cloth (Felted and Silk Fibers)
Victorian Feltmakers Inc (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) 15th May 2011.

Five Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
SDA (Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) 13th to 17th June 2011.

Five Day Disperse Dye Master Class – Barbara Scott
Art Quill Studio (Arcadia Vale, NSW, Australia) 15th to 19th August 2011.

Five Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
Fiber Arts Australia (Sydney, NSW, Australia) 26th September to 1st October 2011.

One Day Workshop – Improvisational Screen Printing
Newcastle Printmakers Workshop Inc. (Newcastle, NSW, Australia) 5th November 2011.

One Day Workshops – Low Relief Screen Printing
Various classes within Australia.

Two Day Workshop – Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
ATASDA (Sydney, NSW, Australia) 23rd to 24th June 2012.

MSDS Demonstration at Zijdelings
(Tilburg, The Netherlands) October, 2012.

Five Day Workshop - Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
Fibre Arts@Ballarat (Ballarat, Victoria, Australia) 6th to 12th April 2013.

Two Day Workshop - Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
EFTAG (Tuross Head, NSW, Australia) 13th to 14th April 2013.

Two Day Workshop - Disperse Dye and Transfer Printing
Zijdelings Studio (Tilburg, The Netherlands) 9th to 10th October 2014.

PCA - Celebrating 50 Years in 2016
Art Quill Studio 2016 Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

Image Dreamings: Basic Silk Screen Printing Workshop - Part II
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

In Pursuit of: Improvisational Screen Printing Workshop
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

In Pursuit of: Low Relief Screen Printing (LRSP) Workshop
2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).

Art Quill Studio 2017 Workshop Program
2017 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program (Newcastle, Australia).


Introduction
To celebrate the Print Council of Australia’s 50 Years in 2016, Art Quill Studio in Arcadia Vale, NSW, Australia will be holding a series of workshops during 2016 tutored by Marie-Therese Wisniowski. The workshops have been structured so that they can be attended as individual workshops or as an on-going series. The workshop program will start with basic printmaking techniques and advance to mastering complex multiple imaging/overprinting relationships and techniques. The techniques are suitable for printing on fabric and paper substrates.

Today's post highlights participants outcomes from Workshop No. 2 in the 2016 Art Quill Studio Workshop Program - Image Dreamings: Basic Silk Screen Printing Part I - and gives links to workshops so that you can view past students outcomes. For Australian enquiries please email me at Marie-Therese. For overseas enquiries these workshops may be held in overseas venues provided that there are enough participants per workshop (10-15 participants) and that within each country a sufficient number of workshops can be organized in order to make the journey cost-effective (5-10 workshops). Please email me at Marie-Therese to initiate a discussion on the feasibility of such an overseas venture.

In person Master Classes are also available. For more details of these Master Classes email me at Marie-Therese. For Master Class outcomes see - Barbara Scott. On-line classes will be available in 2017.


One Day Workshop Synopsis - Image Dreamings: Basic Silk Screen Printing Workshop - Part I
The one day "Image Dreamings: Basic Silk Screen Printing Workshop - Part I" was held at Art Quill Studio in Arcadia Vale, NSW, Australia on the 9th May 2016.

Participants learnt how to create unique and personalized printed imagery using the very versatile silk screen. Participants learnt the basic principles of silk screen printing and were introduced to techniques such as ombre printing, created a temporary stencil, printed positive & negative images and created a two color printed image. No prior experience using a silk screen was needed for this class.

Below are outputs created during the workshop by participant/quilt artist Judi Nikoleski.

Judi Nikoleski displaying her negative and positive silk screened prints.

Judi Nikoleski cutting stencil images for a two colour silk screen print.

Judi printing the two colour silk screened stencil images.

Judi's ombre/blended effects silk screen print employing an indirect stencil technique.

Judi's first multi layered colour, value and texture study employing negative and positive silk screened stencils.

Judi's second multi layered colour, value and texture study employing negative and positive silk screened stencils.

Judi's third multi layered colour, value and texture study employing negative and positive silk screened stencils.

Judi with her completed body of silk screened print samples at the end of the workshop!

Saturday, June 11, 2016

Memory Cloth - Rememberings in Textile
Exhibition@Museum de Kantfabriek (The Netherlands)

Marie-Therese Wisniowski

Museum de Kantfabriek (Horst, Netherlands).

The exhibition: Memory Cloth - Rememberings in Textile - by Els van Baarle (NL), Cherilyn Martin (NL & UK), Cas Holmes (UK) and Glenys Mann (AUS) was held at the Museum de Kantfabriek (Horst, NL) between 12th October 2014 to 4th January 2015. The exhibition was opened by Marie-Therese Wisniowski (AUS).


The Museum de Kantfabriek (Horst, The Netherlands)
The existence of the Museum de Kantfabriek is evidence that the textile industry was the beginning of the economic prosperity in the region of Northern Limburg. The soil was poor and so sheep were kept to provide fertilization. The wool was spun and in winter it was woven. Farmers grew flax to make linen. Nowhere else in The Netherlands was weaving done at home on such a large scale. Thus a knowledge base about the textile industry arose. Where textile industry developed, wonderful feats of textile art and industry came to the fore. The Museum has a special collection of old and modern objects that you can view in permanent and changing exhibitions.

The buildings that make up the Museum de Kantfabriek, Horst, The Netherlands.

When you arrive at the Museum de Kantfabriek you may think you are in a textile factory of the last Century. Rattling machines in the factory creates a lingering memory of the 1930s. At the same time, there exists a modern museum which features textiles and the textile industry in Horst and surrounding regions of the Netherlands.

Entrance to the Museum de Kantfabriek, Horst, The Netherlands.

The Museum displays stimulating exhibitions as well as providing inspiring activities for young and old such as workshops, classes and lectures. In the documentation center of the museum you will discover, in addition to comprehensive genealogical offerings, everything about the history of the region and of its textile history.

Machines at the Museum de Kantfabriek.

Until 2006 the almost antique lace machines were still used daily to produce more than a thousand very fine threads. A number of these machines have been preserved so that visitors to the Museum can see them in a functional condition. You smell the oil, you hear and feel the rumble of the machines - you are in a lace factory. Before your eyes, lace is formed by a combination of machines, bobbins and needles at high speed and with brilliant logic. Effective mechanical magic created by people at a time when there were no highly technical gadgets, no intelligent apps and no computers to support them!

Working lace machines in an old factory, which makes up part of the Museum de Kantfabriek.

Tineke Guerts-Van Rens, Museum Exhibition co-ordinator, introducing the President of the Museum de Kantfabriek Marcella Dings.

President of the Museum de Kantfabriek, Marcella Dings welcoming all attendees to the opening of "Memory Cloth. Rememberings in Textile" exhibition.

Els van Baarle, Marie-Therese Wisniowski and Cherilyn Martin catching up at the opening of the "Memory Cloth. Rememberings in Textile" exhibition.


Opening Talk by Marie-Therese Wisniowski, 12th October, 2014
It is wonderful to be here at this delightful venue to open the exhibition – “Memory Cloth. Rememberings in Textile” by four international renowned textile artists - Els van Baarle (The Netherlands), Cherilyn Martin (The Netherlands/UK), Cas Holmes (UK) and Glenys Mann (Australia). I have known and worked with these artists in a number of different venues within Australia and so have become a real fan of their textile art.

Marie-Therese Wisniowski giving the opening address at the "Memory Cloth. Rememberings in Textile" exhibition.

Of course, in times gone by women were the gatherers and men were the hunters, and so we gathered the “good” stuff, cooked, washed, made and mended clothes, and taught our daughters our co-operative skills. Hence, women quickly embellished the functionality of cloth into artworks in their own right. For example, there is an embroidered silk gauze ritual garment, which displays rows of even, round chain stitches that were used both for outline and to fill in color of the cloth. It was created in the 4th century BC and was discovered in the Zhou era tomb at Mashan, Hubei province in China. This cloth now forms part of our collective memory. From that time onward, if not before, women have dominated the fibre and textile arts.

Memories of pivotal events in an artists’ life have often been captured in their fibre art. ArtCloth purposely made to herald such events are not necessarily narrative images on cloth, but rather expose a complex psychological state of mind and so may manifest itself as abstract expressionistic motifs on cloth. Each artist in this exhibition has done just that by creating memories on the cloth and/or prints that are both complex and varied. Their techniques are different, since the encapsulation of particular memories varies (as they should) and so decidedly yield rich and complex artworks.

Els van Baarle is a textile artist/teacher from The Netherlands, who teaches surface design classes throughout the world. Her sources of inspiration stem from ancient history; in particular, those periods that trace, underlie and help forge our present time. In this exhibition she wishes to capture the wear and tear of time and she does so by using the slow process of multiple layers of wax and dyes on paper and cloth resulting in a body of complex artworks which feature a wealth of color and depth but that encapsulate the gradual erosion of memory itself. Such works include the long red diptych - hand woven cotton from Indonesia - that Els took with her on trips and embroidered her daily experiences as a record of capturing fleeting events. On one of the other works in this exhibition Els has printed maps on cloth and paper envelopes, which record the numerous places and connection that she has to Zeeland. A Latin bible has been pulled apart, waxed, dyed and re-assembled into an 8 meter long work thus re-contextualizing the book physically, artistically and subverting its associated reverence into an expressive and radical interpretation of memory, words and meaning.

General view of exhibition.

Cherilyn Martin heralds from the UK and The Netherlands and is a world-renowned fibre artist as well as an international tutor in textile arts. In this exhibition, Cherilyn traces memories and personal history via a series of concepts and employs specific techniques to iterate these transient glimpses. In her ‘Memory Cloth - 3 Generations’ series she has created sensitive contemporary works by hand embroidering faces in red thread onto antique lace handkerchiefs. The faces reflect a place in time and history, that is, the minimalist outlines which she uses to capture the essence of a character behind these portraits are stitched onto antique handkerchiefs. Each handkerchief has been originally edged with intricate tatted lace designs. Tatting is a unique type of knotted lace that was popular from the 19th century through the middle of the 20th century. By exploiting these two various media, concepts of time, past experiences and emotions are embedded.

Cherilyn also finds inspiration from remnants of architecture - in particular in the abandoned cave dwellings and cave churches such as the “chiese rupestri” of Basilicata, in Southern Italy. Furthermore she adds: “Underlying themes in my work deal with bereavement, loss and commemoration. I am currently working on a series of stitch drawings, embroidering some personal memories by hand. Inspired by the etched lines of cave drawings, I have stitched silhouettes onto both paper and cloth and included texts taken from my favourite poems about personal loss.”

General view of exhibition.

Cas Holmes travels the world exhibiting her textile pieces as well as tutoring workshops on textiles. Her artworks contain found papers, textiles and discarded materials which she cuts, tears, re-assembles and stitches into multi layered mixed media works which reference the relationships between the urban and natural landscapes. The sensitive execution of hand and machine stitching, dye and paint surface treatments further encapsulates the expressive linear forms, colors and shapes that reflect her connection to the fleeting memories that inform the work.

Her “Memory Cloth Lace Museum” maps the wild spaces, the wasteland, roadside verges, waterways and the places where gardens meet the greater landscape onto cloth. She has collected on her travels many of the materials she used in this exhibition. She adds: ”The pieces in this exhibition celebrates the flora to be found in vintage textiles and these have been added to with my own mark. I have also incorporated lace and materials gathered from the museum. I grew up in Norfolk. It too, is a 'flat land' and there is a deep connection between my 'home' with its reclaimed land and dykes (water protective earth walls) and the flat areas of the Netherlands. Both Horst and Norwich were also known for their lace”.

General view of exhibition.

Glenys Mann is an internationally respected Australian contemporary quilt maker who works with “found” cloth, namely old woollen blankets, hand knitted baby clothing, silk - and such like. Amongst her many talents she also runs numerous textile workshops throughout Australia. Over the last few years Glenys has been exploring the world of digital imaging using worn cloth garments as the inspiration for her prints on paper. The works exhibited here link all of us to the human experience of birth, rites of passage and the garments that share our memories and experiences during these early years. Glenys’ artwork is inspired by emotions of the cloth as well as the emotions of everyday life. She muses that, “The art I make speaks, shouts, whispers, breathes in a language of silence. Their presence is tangible. I photograph found cloth because it has a powerful human presence and has the capacity to express humanity, human endeavor, and emotion. The Cloth image holds within itself the memory of all rites of passage, for at first and last we are bound by its weave.”

General view of exhibition.

I know you will enjoy this exhibition as these artists take you on their journeys of remembrances, that just like any book or print, will provoke and evoke their captured experiences.

Marie-Therese Wisniowski was the co-editor of Textile Fibre Forum (the largest textile art magazine in Australasia), a casual lecturer at the University of Newcastle (Australia), an exhibiting ArtCloth artist and an international tutor of textile arts and surface design techniques.


Memory Cloth - Rememberings in Textile
Els van Baarle (The Netherlands) - Artist Statement
I am a textile artist/teacher from the Netherlands. I teach surface design classes all over the world. I have won many awards and prizes with my large scale art-cloth pieces. My work has been widely published. My artworks are in private and museum collections.

Sources of inspiration are ancient history, traces of the past. The wear and tear of time. I love the slow process of using wax and dye many times. The result is a wonderful cloth with a wealth of color and depth.

Els van Baarle surrounded by her installations and artworks at the opening of "Memory Cloth - Rememberings in Textile" exhibition at the Museum de Kantfabriek, Horst, The Netherlands.

Els van Baarle's ArtWork: Memory Cloth - Rememberings in Textile
Els van Baarle finds inspiration in antiquity and in particular, of the effect that the passage of time has on a textile surface.

Title: Letters from a Friend (Full view).

Letters from a Friend. Since the death of Henk Week (1940 - 2007) I am working on a series of "Letters to a Friend".

Henk was a teacher in the village of Renesse, Zeeland. He collected stamps, but also stamped envelopes. Because of his hobby many friends would keep envelopes for him. Henk sorted everything very systematically. After his death, his collection of thousands of envelopes was threatened to be discarded as waste paper. I wanted to prevent this and so I took all of my friend's boxes home. I saw very quickly that I could use these letters in my artwork. In my contribution to this exhibition, I have used approximately 1,000 envelopes in which I have screen printed, painted and stitched them together.

Title: Letters from a Friend (Detail view).

Installation on the left: Title - And all this happened.
Material: Textiles.
Technique: Dyed, embroidered and discharged.
Installation on the right: Title - A Quiet Spot III.
Material: 7 Silk cloths.
Technique: Dyed batik, embroidery and discharged.

Title: Side Letters (Full view - one of five works).

Title: Side Letters (Detail view - one of five works).

Title: Novum testamentum latine.
Material: Bible.
Technique: Batik and serigraphy.

Title: A Quiet Place II.
Material: Paper and fabric roll.

Material: Old towel textiles.
Technique: Batik.

Cherilyn Martin (The Netherlands and UK) - Artist Statement
I continue to find inspiration in remnants of architecture, in particular in the abandoned cave dwellings and cave churches “cheese rupestri’ of Basilicata, in Southern Italy. Cave walls engraved with visual narratives and the fading fresco’s found in rock churches are evidence of story telling which has been so important to Man throughout history.

Exploiting the tactility of the various media I use, to interpret surfaces ravaged by time and the elements, has been at the foundation of my working process.

Developing surfaces in which concepts of time, experience and emotion are embodied.

Underlying themes in my work deal with bereavement, loss and commemoration.

I am currently working on a series of stitch drawings, embroidering some personal memories by hand. Inspired by the etched lines of cave drawings, I have stitched silhouettes onto both paper and cloth and included texts taken from my favourite poems about personal loss.

The slow process of hand stitching allows time for recollection, contemplation and meditation.

Cherilyn Martin surrounded by her installations and artworks at the opening of "Memory Cloth. Rememberings in Textile" exhibition at the Museum de Kantfabriek, Horst, The Netherlands.

Cherilyn Martin's ArtWork: Memory Cloth - Rememberings in Textile
Cherilyn Martin is inspired by textures found on the walls in temples, cemeteries and in underground mines.

Title: Disenchanted Bride 1.
Material: Antique blouse and cotton embroidery thread.
Technique: Hand embroidery.

Title: Pillow Books 1, 2 en 3 (Full view).
Material: Cotton, scrim, Tissuetex, spunfab, fabric paint and antique lace collars.
Technique: Rust, lamination and screen printing.

Title: Pillow Book 3 (Detail view).

Title: Tempus Fugit #4.
Materials: Cotton, silk organza, fusible webbing, batting.
Techniques: Controlled rusting with screen printing, machine stitching, burning, fusing.

Title: Graven Images 9.
Material: Paper, glue, acrylic wash, wax crayon and acrylics & procion.
Technique: Own technique.

Title: What's the Point 2.
Material: Paper, joss paper, procion paint, crayons, glue and acrylic wash.
Technique: Screen printing and momigami.

Title: It's the Stones that Speak 10 (Full view).
Material: Synthetic felt, cotton knitted fabrics, fusible film, fabric paint and spunfab.
Technique: Rust, lamination and screen printing.

Title: It's the Stones that Speak 10 (Detail view).

Cas Holmes (UK) - Artist Statement
I trained in fine arts and work between the disciplines of painting, drawing and textiles. I refer to the wild spaces, the wasteland, roadside verges, waterways and the places where our gardens meet the greater landscape.These are the 'common places' which are not town or countryside, but rather 'edgelands', and they have a strange beauty all of their own. Many of the materials used in pieces are collected as I travel. The pieces in this exhibition celebrates the flora to be found in vintage textiles and these have been added to with my own mark. I have also incorporated lace and materials gathered from the museum. I grew up in Norfolk. It too, is a 'flat land' and there is a deep connection between my 'home' with it reclaimed land and dykes and the flat areas of the Netherlands. Both Horst and Norwich were also known for their lace.

View of Cas Holmes' installations and artworks area at the opening of "Memory Cloth. Rememberings in Textile" exhibition at the Museum de Kantfabriek, Horst, The Netherlands.

Cas Holmes' ArtWork: Memory Cloth - Rememberings in Textile
Can Holmes is inspired by the relationship between nature, development and lifecycle themes.

Title: Commonplace-Ranscombe.
Material: Textiles and found materials.

Title: Commonplace-Horrid Hill.
Material: Textiles and found materials.

Title: Commonplace-Marsh Sowthistle.
Material: Textiles and found materials.

Title: Garden Paths - Dandelion in the Cracks.

Title: Canterbury Bells.
Marking the flower and the city of its name.

Title: Wayside Grasses.
This piece marks the plants and grasses left to grow along our verges and pathway.
Material: Lace and vintage textiles donated by students from my local Adult Education class in Maidstone.

Title: Thin Red Line (2).

Glenys Mann (Australia) - Artist Statement
I am a contemporary quilt maker that works with ‘found’ cloth, namely old wool blankets, hand knitted baby clothing and silk.

My work is inspired by emotions of the cloth and emotions of everyday life.

“The art I make speaks, shouts, whispers, breathes in a language of silence. Their presence is tangible. I photograph found cloth because it has a powerful human presence and has the capacity to express humanity, human endeavor, emotion. The Cloth image holds within itself the memory of all rites of passage, for at first and last we are bound by its weave.”

View 1 of Glenys Manns' installation artwork area at the opening of 'Memory Cloth. Rememberings in Textile' exhibition at the Museum de Kantfabriek, Horst, The Netherlands.

Glenys Manns' ArtWork: Memory Cloth - Rememberings in Textile
Materials and Technique Information: Glenys Manns' artworks were created using “found” cloth dyed in natural dyes, hand stitched, machine stitched, dyed, waxed, batiked. Final images were created as large format digital prints. All works are photographs of hand knits taken by Glenys Mann and manipulated in Photoshop. Digitally printed on acid free paper.

Glenys Manns' works with used textiles and is inspired by the emotions that they evoke.

View 2 of Glenys Manns' installation artwork area.

View 3 of Glenys Manns' installation artwork area.

Title: Bound by Thread.
Technique: Digital print.

Title: Memory.
Technique: Digital print.

Title: Rites of Passage.
Technique: Digital print.

Title: At First and Last.
Technique: Digital print.